Current Standard of Care for Patients with Multiple Myeloma Based on Their Eligibility for Autologous Stem-Cell Transplant

Video Library —April 23, 2020
Charise Gleason, MSN, NP-BC, AOCNP
Advanced Practice Provider Chief, Winship Cancer Institute,
Emory University,
Atlanta, GA
Kathryn Maples, PharmD, BCOP
Clinical Pharmacy Specialist, Multiple Myeloma, and PGY2 Oncology Residency Research Coordinator,
Winship Cancer Institute, Emory Healthcare,
Atlanta, GA
Chelsea Sprouse, RN-BSN, MSN, NP-C
Nurse Practitioner, Inpatient and Outpatient Malignant Hematology,
Levine Cancer Institute,
Charlotte, NC

Charise Gleason, MSN, NP-BC, AOCNP, Kathryn Maples, PharmD, BCOP, and Chelsea Sprouse, RN-BSN, MSN, NP-C, discuss the current standard of care for both high- and low-risk patients with newly diagnosed or recurrent/refractory multiple myeloma who are initially not eligible for autologous stem-cell transplant and who subsequently become transplant-eligible.

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