January 2021 Vol 12, No 1

Whether called New Year’s resolutions or personal goals, the beginning of a new year is a time for personal reflection and an opportunity to make positive changes in our lives and set our focus on new achievements.
Each year, at the AONN+ annual conference, we pause to take note of the navigators and organizations among us who have made a significant impact in the field of oncology navigation. Although virtual, 2020 was no different, and it was with pride that we announced the 2020 class of AONN+ Award recipients. It is the distinct honor of the JONS Editorial Board and the AONN+ Leadership Council to recognize the navigators and organizations in our community who have made considerable contributions to our chosen specialty. This class of awardees includes a stellar group of navigators and organizations, each with their own unique and inspiring stories. Below, we tell their stories in the hope it provides inspiration to you in your professional life as an oncology nurse navigator or a patient navigator.
Many practices and institutions have implemented navigation programs to improve oncology care. Although professional oncology nursing organizations have established, well-defined roles and responsibilities for navigators, many practices and institutions have yet to adopt formal job descriptions for their navigators.
Bret Miller is a 10-year breast cancer survivor, and he’s a guy.
When it comes to cancer care, organizations tend to define value in terms of objective factors like efficacy, toxicity, and cost. But according to Elizabeth Franklin, PhD, MSW, executive director of the Cancer Policy Institute at the Cancer Support Community in Washington, DC, patients tend to define value differently when it comes to their care.
Navigation-based interventions designed to address the financial and insurance needs of adolescents and young adults (AYAs) with cancer might significantly decrease their financial burden, according to Anne C. Kirchhoff, PhD, MPH, associate professor of pediatrics at Huntsman Cancer Institute, University of Utah.
More than 1.8 million people were estimated to develop cancer in the United States in 2020, according to the American Cancer Society. Of these, 333,680 (18.5%) were estimated to develop cancer in the gastrointestinal (GI) system.

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