March 2016 VOL 7, NO 2

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Letters from Lillie

Improving Oncology Care with Patient Education

Lillie D. Shockney, RN, BS, MAS, ONN-CG 

Lillie_Shockley98pxHello everyone and welcome to the March 2016 issue of the Journal of Oncology Navigation & Survivorship (JONS)! This issue includes pertinent information that covers a wide breadth of topics, all of which are applicable to your navigation work with patients with cancer.

We know that cancer-related fatigue is one of the most common side effects that patients with cancer experience, and it also commonly lingers after treatment is completed. Is exercise an effective way to reduce this troubling side effect? Find out in an article explaining how you can help your patients resume the active life they had before their diagnosis.

This issue also contains information about a particular type of cancer—multiple myeloma. Although the volume of patients with this type of cancer is not like that of prostate, breast, lung, or colorectal cancer in the United States, multiple myeloma has a huge impact on those who are diagnosed. In addition, March is Myeloma Awareness Month; take this opportunity to learn facts about this disease and its treatment, and raise public awareness about the symptoms and risks associated with multiple myeloma.

Continually increasing in incidence, diabetes is a common comorbidity, but did you know that it can also increase a patient’s risk for urologic diseases, such as bladder cancer? In addition, it is a contributor to other quality-of-life–altering side effects, such as bladder dysfunction and sexual disorders. Read through this issue and see whether this is impacting the patients you navigate.

Over the past few years, there have been changes made to the cancer screening guidelines of several types of cancer. In this issue of JONS, you will learn, specifically, about the changes to the cervical cancer screening guidelines, which have become the most relaxed they have ever been since their inception. Is this change good or bad? Read on to find out, and factor this information into the education you provide your patients with regard to getting their Papanicolaou tests. You may even choose to write your own article on the cervical cancer screening guidelines.

This, however, begs the question: Are you ready to write a research abstract? Do not avoid reading our featured article on this subject! Designed to eliminate your fears and empower you to seriously consider taking a crack at writing your abstract, this article includes information on how to prepare to write your abstract, components of a research abstract, and where to look for inspiration.

Another article covers the subject of colorectal cancer, which is one of the most common forms of cancer diagnosed today. This article is dedicated to providing information about navigating patients from the point of screening, to diagnosis, through treatment, and into long-term survivorship care. We hope that reading it helps those navigating this patient population.

Based on feedback from Academy of Oncology Nurse & Patient Navigators members who read JONS and value its content, we are in the process of increasing its frequency. So plan to receive your next issue of JONS in April and monthly thereafter!

With kind regards,

Lillie D. Shockney, RN, BS, MAS
Editor-in-Chief
University Distinguished Service Associate Professor of Breast Cancer, Depts of Surgery and Oncology;
Administrative Director, The Johns Hopkins Breast Center; Director, Cancer Survivorship Programs at the Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins;
Associate Professor, JHU School of Medicine, Depts of Surgery, Oncology & Gynecology and Obstetrics; Associate Professor, JHU School of Nursing
Baltimore, MD
E-mail: shockli@jhmi.edu

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